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Exciting News

Tab Staff at LitHub

Tab staffers Sam Risak and Tryphena Yeboah collaborated with Tab Editor Anna Leahy on “What Happens When Literary Events Move Online?” at Literary Hub. This article explores how organizers of literary events across the country have been rethinking their goals and audiences and have been experimenting with online formats for author events of all kinds.

As part of their investigation of how the pandemic is changing literary culture, they interviewed Guy Choate of the Argenta Reading Series, historian Jaipreet Virdi, Steph Opitz of the Wordplay festival, Association of Writers and Writing Programs board member Stephanie Vanderslice, Victoria Chang of the Antioch University low-residency MFA Program, Utah Poet Laureate Paisley Rekdal, Genevieve Kaplan of the Tabula Poetica series, and mangers at The King’s English Bookshop and Writer’s Block Bookstore.

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New Issue

New Issue!

It’s here! Check out the Current Issue for Volume 8, Issue 6.

This issue is the last of 2020 and features poets Matthew J. Andrews, Jake Bailey, Tatiana Dolgushina, Dia Roth, and Kelly S. Samuels, plus reviews of books by Tariq Luthun, Julia Bouwsma, Eve Ewing, and Emily Jungmin Yoon.

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Exciting News Important Update

Free Copies of Tab for Classes

Because of the pandemic, Tab Journal‘s ability to distribute copies of this year’s print issue was limited. We’re excited that Tab Staff will be able to send batches out again in November for class use.

Professors, teachers, community workshop leaders, and librarians who want to distribute copies can use the Contact form to request a batch of the 2020 print issue of Tab Journal; we’ll need your address and the number of copies needed. We also have copies of print issues from 2019 (translucent brochure) and 2018 (package of postcards) available. We realize that classes and literary events may be virtual and are happy to send copies to have on hand as a sign of optimism for gathering in person again.

We hope to welcome requests for individual copies soon as well.

Each January print issue is uniquely designed and, therefore, has a long shelf life as a literary object. The 2020 print issue features ten poems in an issue that readers can assemble. Because we aren’t able to pay contributors, Tab Journal doesn’t charge a submission fee and is distributed at no cost to readers.

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Important Update Submission Info

Submissions Open!

Subscribe to Tab Musings for the latest goings-on!

Tab Journal is now open for submissions!

Tab Journal is now seeking poems for our March and July issues. In addition, we consider critical and creative essays and art–poetry pieces. If your work has something to do with poetry, send it our way.

To get a better idea of the range of what Tab Journal publishes, browse through the Archives. In a recent Tab Musings post, we also recently discussed “How We Read Poems.” You may also want to take a look at the increasingly diverse Tab Staff. We welcome submissions from writers with a variety of backgrounds, experiences, voices, and aesthetics.

The Tab Staff also write book reviews and interviews. If you are an author or a publisher with a book forthcoming in 2021, use the Contact form to query. While we prefer hard copies for review, we are currently restricted on office use because of the pandemic.

To submit to Tab Journal, use our Submittable portal.

open notebook with binder clip and pen
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Important Update

Subscribe to Tab Musings

Sign up for the once-a-month newsletter from Tab Journal, including info about submissions and new issues, Tab Author news, Tabula Poetica events, tips for poets, and more.

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Exciting News

LitHub Article by Tab Staff

Tab staffers Sam Risak and Tryphena Yeboah, along with Tab Editor Anna Leahy, wrote about the pandemic-instigated switch from in-person to online events for Literary Hub. They interviewed event organizers from book stores, festivals and conferences, universities, and more. The article asks what engagement and sales means for literary culture going forward. Check out “What Happens When Literary Events Move Online?

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Exciting News New Issue

Book-Spine Poems!

The September issue is here—and it’s full of Book-Spine Poems for Pandemic Times.

The Idea Behind the September Issue

Stack of Books so that titles make a poem

In 2013, New York-based artist Nina Kathchadourian published a collection of photographs of book spines called Sorted Books. In the book’s introduction, Brian Dillon writes, “it is as though the books have convened of their own accord like plants or insects—following secret or, in the case of more explicitly comic or narrative groupings, not-so-secret attractions.” That project rested on the idea, in Dillon’s words, “that books are objects designed to be handled.” 

We’ve been thinking about this project for a long time and about how Tab Journal might encourage found-and-constructed literary and visual art. From its inception, Tab Journal has explored relationships between print and digital forms, between text and image, between writer and reader. In book-spine poems, the reader of books becomes the writer of the poem. The lines are the books’ titles, so is the poem written or curated? Does the poem say as much about the writer–curator’s reading habits as it does about the subject of the poem that’s been constructed?

What’s on Whose Shelf?

After the pandemic changed ways we access libraries and physical bookstores, Tab Journal sought poems composed and formed by stacking physical books as objects designed to be handled. This issue of Book-Spine Poems for Pandemic Times is a selection of both individuals’ bookshelves and what’s on people’s minds at this historical moment. Of course, it’s also a collection of remarkable, intriguing poems using shared constraints.

In reading this issue, it’s important also to consider who has a bookshelf at home and what that means. One recent global study indicated that kids who grow up with books in the home tend to perform better academically. A home library is likely a side effect of the sort of wealth and education that open doors as much as it is part of a learning environment that builds skills and empathy that foster achievement. We hope that this issue of Tab Journal opens a larger conversation about books in our lives.

read more while September is the Current Issue.

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Exciting News

Tab Poets: News

Two of Brian Satrom‘s poems appeared in the March 2015 issue of Tab Journal. Now, “From Within” and “Farther Than I Thought” are part of his first book, Starting Again.

page of a poetry book

Genevieve Kaplan‘s new book, (aviary), is now available. Genevieve is the Guest Curator for the 2020 Tabula Poetica reading series. Her poetry first appeared in Tab Journal n the March 2016 issue and also appeared in the September 2017 issue, when she was a visiting poet in the Tabula Poetica series. She started teaching at Chapman University the following year.

Jen Karetnick, whose poem appears in the July 2020 issue (current issue), wrote a humorous piece for Submittable titled “Disgruntled Student Who Never Attended Online Composition Course Evaluates Professor Via Her Bitmoji.”

Katherine E. Young‘s poem also appeared in the July 2020 issue. She recently appeared on Accents Radio Show to talk with Katerina Stoykova about translation. A review of a book Katerina translated appeared in the July 2017 issue of Tab Journal.

Tab staffer Tryphena Yeboah had a second short story published by Narrative this summer. She also wrote about her first experience protesting in the United States. Her poetry chapbook is available for pre-order and ships on September 8; it’s part of the New-Generation African Poets boxed set from Akashic Books.

first page of an essay by Anna Leahy

Tab staffer Jason Thornberry, a musician himself, wrote about musician Junior Murvin and police brutality for Dissident Voice this summer.

Tab Editor Anna Leahy won the 2018 Nonfiction Award from Los Angeles Review. A Brief Encyclopedia of My Mother’s Cancer” was published online this summer.

Tab Creative Director Claudine Jaenichen is working with FEMA to develop accessible visual tools for communication information about COVID-19. Her talk “Visual + Effective Communication for Emergency Information” is available on YouTube.

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Events

Tabula Poetica Series

Tabula Poetica announces the visiting poets for our annual series of talks and readings. As always, Tabula Poetica events are free and open to the public, and the Fall 2020 will be live-streamed on Facebook and YouTube for the first time.

three poetry books: why can't it be tenderness, all things lose thousands of times, street gloss

Monday, October 5: Michelle Brittan Rosado
Poetry Talk at 2:30pm | Poetry Reading at 7pm
author website

Monday, October 19: Angela Peñaredondo
Poetry Talk at 2:30pm | Poetry Reading at 7pm
more about this poet

Monday, November 9: Brent Armendinger
Poetry Talk at 2:30pm | Poetry Reading at 7pm
author website

Monday, December 14: MFA Poetry Reading
Poetry Reading at 7pm

Special thanks to this year’s guest curator, Genevieve Kaplan, and to Samantha de la O for coordinating the logistics.

Note that all times are Pacific Time, and these events are sponsored by the Department of English at Chapman University and Tabula Poetica.

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More about TAB Submission Info

How We Read Poems

Earlier this summer, Editor Anna Leahy’s craft essay about punctuation in poetry appeared at Waxwing. This essay was originally developed as a presentation for the Association of Writers and Writing Programs Conference (but was not presented because of the pandemic). Leahy opens:

As a poet, I’m intrigued by the tension between the clarity of standard grammar and the innovation that can emerge when grammatical conventions are elided or subverted. I spend an inordinate amount of time on social media defending the Oxford comma, yet when I put my own pen to poem, I treat each comma as a choice. When I read poems, grammatical mistakes irritate me, unless they don’t. Poetry’s punctuation follows what I’d like to call the principle of full expression.

At Tab Journal, we read for full expression, not applying one simple or objective standard or another but, instead, looking at each poem according to the terms it sets for itself on the page or screen and aloud. Later in that essay, Leahy refers also to “the full expression of lived experience” that a poem represents. The range of lived experience in this world is why Tab Journal seeks poems that, together in each issue and over a given year’s volume, demonstrate aesthetic, topical, and experiential variety.

The poem submissions are first read by staff, all of whom are alums of or current students in the MFA in Creative Writing program at Chapman University. This year, that’s been Liz Harmer, Daniel Miess, Laila Shikaki, Jason Thornberry, and Tryphena Yeboah. Each submission is read by at least two staff, often three, after which the editor makes final decisions. Any one staffer’s enthusiastic yes is taken seriously so that a yes is never merely canceled out by another staffer’s no. The process also allows for the maybe—an interest, a questioning. Because the staff represents diverse perspectives and aesthetics, Tab Journal uses this approach to the individual yes or maybe to challenge the status quo and to avoid drowning out an underrepresented point of view.

Of course, we end up with more good poems than we publish, so final decisions involve additional considerations. How will the contents of an issue play off each other—complement, contradict, challenge, talk with, and build upon each other? What does a curated group of poems make together? The 2020 print issue, in fact, can be literally built out of the poems that are its contents.

We also consider how each poem will appear visually in the format Tab Journal has chosen as part of its design constraints. Because we use pdf files instead of blog formatting, the online issues allow for a great deal of agility within the constraint of the screen’s page size and orientation. They’re also downloadable. While we value consistency, we are not tied, for instance, to a set margin for the sake of having a set margin, when a particular poem challenges that aspect of our style guide. Formatting decisions are guided first by accessibility and then by balancing the poem’s aesthetics with the journal’s format.

Stacked tower from printed panels in the Vol. 8, 2020 print issue

Finally, each year, the Editor and the Creative Director look back at the design and the contents to understand the journal’s trajectory and make changes. We’ve selected the content for this year’s remaining issues, and we’ve now begun that process of looking back over the year. Creating a completely new design for each January print issue forces us to reconsider our assumptions, recognize our strengths and weaknesses, and take new risks.

Tab Journal strives to be a project where poetry meets design in inclusive reading experiences. We read poems with that vision in mind. And we ask you to join us in this reading experience!